Unentitled

Unentitled

One weekend morning, my mom and I had an argument over the phone. On this particular day, she called me an asshole. I was furious, absolutely livid. So I brought my anger with my to individual supervision session with Amy. Her response: “Michael, you were an asshole. Your mom wasn’t wrong.” We talked about my propensity for picking fights with my my and deliberately saying things to piss her off. We talked about my expectations and the insanity/unfairness from asking of my mom what I knew was outside her capacity, and the frequency with which I did this both to my mom and to many others in my life. Truth was harsh: I was spoiled. Selfish (in an unhealthy way). Entitled.

Inescapable

Inescapable

I still cannot believe I’ve been here for (just shy of) a year. I can’t believe how much progress I’ve made in learning to read/write/speak/understand Korean (sometimes with significant resistance). I can’t believe how well I’ve adjusted to eating food far spicier than I ever tolerated in America (things like 떡볶이/tteokbokki or 닭갈비/dak-galbi). Hardest of all, I can’t believe how, after a year, I’m still regularly dealing with some of the same old demons, anxieties, frustrations, and challenges that haunted me before I ever stepped foot in Asia.

Unbiased Reflections

Unbiased Reflections

I know, I know. Two more months have passed since I last wrote. In those two months, I went to my first Pride Parade abroad (followed by a meltdown at seeing how many conservative Christians felt it was their God-ordained duty to protest said parade), started to work out again, made a new Korean friend, lost/was ghosted by said Korean friend for reasons I may never know, signed a new contract to extend my time in Korea by another year, and as of this week, finished another semester of teaching (including my first high school class). It would be a huge understatement to call the past two months busy/hectic/insane.

Journey Envy

Journey Envy

When I was in first or second grade, my first TV set was black and white with rotary dials and an antenna. No buttons, no remote, no cable TV. My childhood clothes often came from Family Dollar, Dollar General (where my mom worked), Goodwill, or on special occasions, Walmart. My first name brand pair of shoes were FILA (which, by the way, is an insanely popular brand here in South Korea). I remember thinking brands like Old Navy, JNCO, GAP, or any novelty item purchased at Spencer’s or later (the forbidden) Hot Topic gave a kid instant notoriety. Even in elementary school, I remember feeling deep sense of being different, long before I became aware of other ways in which my life and experience did not mirror those of my peers.

Travelin' Thru

Travelin' Thru

I just got back Monday from a weekend getaway to Seoul during which I got to see an old seminary friend while also making some new ones (both Korean and foreign). Good food, craft beers, amazing conversations (in both Korean and English), and letting myself get lost in a city that’s becoming more familiar with each subsequent visit. After a month of significant emotional processing and “spoon” recovery, the time away was vital to reclaiming my sanity. While I’ve really only taken time to travel to Seoul since I arrived, it’s a large enough city with enough diversity of people and of experiences that each time still feels new. Eventually I’ll make it to other cities in the country (and other countries as well). For now, there’s another kind of traveling I’ve been focusing on: traveling thru my own story.

Debriding Old Wounds

Debriding Old Wounds

Six months ago, I landed in South Korea and began this crazy adventure of teaching English to Korean elementary school students. I knew before signing my contract that I wanted my time living abroad to be not only challenging but also transformative, particularly in regard to my spiritual well-being. In the spirit of this desire, I heeded some sage advice and sought out a spiritual director I could work with. Based in California, N. (as I will call her) has experience working with creative types, with members of the LGBTQ+ community, and with trauma survivors. Initially, I thought I would just be working with her to reinvigorate my faith and my spiritual journey. What I didn’t realize was just how much trauma, particularly religious trauma, I experienced growing up and how the pain of that trauma is still very much with me today.

Disconnected

Disconnected

For many of my queer friends, the question is often posed to them by non-UMC friends, straight and gay alike, “Why don’t you just leave?” As someone who left the UMC because I could not pursue God’s call on my life into ordained ministry without sacrificing my integrity, I can attest to how frustrating and sometimes infuriating this question is. The question often comes from a place of care and with good intention, but only recently did I realize that it’s basically the same question these queer friends are asked by the conservative members of the denomination: “If you don’t like the way we do things here, why don’t you just leave?”

Hibernation

Hibernation

I thought about this period of winter, of silence and routine, and how the repetition and the quiet are training me to also slow down my need to move restlessly and unnecessarily. I think about what it would be like to stop moving for weeks at a time, not because I’m sick or incapacitated, but because it’s my body’s natural reaction to my environment. It’s what my body needs…

Screen time

Screen time

Social media. Texting. Messaging. Photos. Videos. News. Music. Online dating, or more accurately, online “dating.” Communication, if that’s what we really want to call it. More often than not, it just feels like digital noise, drowning out my soul’s cry for genuine connection. I don’t like writing this. I don’t enjoy admitting how desperate I feel most days for a constant stream of interaction that serves as a poor substitute for heartfelt intimacy. On an average day, I pick up my phone between 80-100 times. That translates to once every 10 minutes, on par with the reported national average.

Going deeper

Going deeper

Thankfully, there are those who have seen beyond my faults and behavioral compulsions deeper to where my True Self lies: in my Belovedness. They choose to have a relationship with me not because I’m special in some grandiose way, or because of what I’m able to do or accomplish. They love me simply because they choose to. In these relationships I’ve found a deeper truth: God loves me, loves all of us, in the exact same way — just because.